”Observe the Moon Night”

NASA needs to evolve for the future, not get stuck in the past, the agency’s deputy chief said this week.

Speaking at an event at Manhattan’s Explorers Club, NASA’s second in command, Lori Garver, said it was time to kick start commercial spaceflight to low-Earth orbit and shift NASA’s focus to more ambitious exploration missions.

“Our space program needs to not be reliving the space program of the past,” she said. “We have been trying to relive Apollo for 40 years now.”

Instead of sending astronauts back to the moon, Garver espoused the new plan put forward by President Barack Obama to pursue trips to an asteroid and Mars. Meanwhile, NASA would try to shift the responsibility for transporting people to the International Space Station to the private sector, which has already made some strides toward commercial spacecraft capable of reaching orbit.

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NASA needs to evolve for the future, not get stuck in the past, the agency’s deputy chief said this week.

By Clara Moskowitz,  SPACE.com Senior Writer: 17 September 2010

Speaking at an event at Manhattan’s Explorers Club, NASA’s second in command, Lori Garver, said it was time to kick start commercial spaceflight to low-Earth orbit and shift NASA’s focus to more ambitious exploration missions.

“Our space program needs to not be reliving the space program of the past,” she said. “We have been trying to relive Apollo for 40 years now.”

Instead of sending astronauts back to the moon, Garver espoused the new plan put forward by President Barack Obama to pursue trips to an asteroid and Mars. Meanwhile, NASA would try to shift the responsibility for transporting people to the International Space Station to the private sector, which has already made some strides toward commercial spacecraft capable of reaching orbit.

Read more
NASA needs to evolve for the future, not get stuck in the past, the agency’s deputy chief said this week.

By Clara Moskowitz, SPACE.com Senior Writer: 17 September 2010

Speaking at an event at Manhattan’s Explorers Club, NASA’s second in command, Lori Garver, said it was time to kick start commercial spaceflight to low-Earth orbit and shift NASA’s focus to more ambitious exploration missions.

“Our space program needs to not be reliving the space program of the past,” she said. “We have been trying to relive Apollo for 40 years now.”

Instead of sending astronauts back to the moon, Garver espoused the new plan put forward by President Barack Obama to pursue trips to an asteroid and Mars. Meanwhile, NASA would try to shift the responsibility for transporting people to the International Space Station to the private sector, which has already made some strides toward commercial spacecraft capable of reaching orbit.

Read more
NASA needs to evolve for the future, not get stuck in the past, the agency’s deputy chief said this week.

By Clara Moskowitz, SPACE.com Senior Writer: Sep 2010

Speaking at an event at Manhattan’s Explorers Club, NASA’s second in command, Lori Garver, said it was time to kick start commercial spaceflight to low-Earth orbit and shift NASA’s focus to more ambitious exploration missions.

“Our space program needs to not be reliving the space program of the past,” she said. “We have been trying to relive Apollo for 40 years now.”

Instead of sending astronauts back to the moon, Garver espoused the new plan put forward by President Barack Obama to pursue trips to an asteroid and Mars. Meanwhile, NASA would try to shift the responsibility for transporting people to the International Space Station to the private sector, which has already made some strides toward commercial spacecraft capable of reaching orbit.

Read more

People who think more about whether they are right have more cells in an area of the brain known as the frontal lobes.

By Katie Alcock, Science reporter, BBC News

UK scientists, writing in Science, looked at how brain size varied depending on how much people thought about decisions. But a nationwide survey recently found that some people think too much about life. These people have poorer memories, and they may also be depressed. The study is the first to show that there are physical differences between people with regards to how big this area is. These size differences relate to how much they think about their own decisions.

This Saturday night people will be gathering in groups around the world to examine Earth’s nearest celestial neighbor as part of the first ever International Observe the Moon Night.

Ker Than for National Geographic News, Sep 2010
Photograph by Siamak Sabet, My Shot

The global event is a joint project between NASA and several partners to raise awareness about the scientific importance of the moon, such as studying how the solar system formed or planning any future human missions to the lunar surface.

“If we can get people to notice the moon a little more, they might notice it when it’s in the news,” said Andy Shaner, a spokesperson for the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, which is helping to coordinate the event.

Read more on National Geographic

Find out more about the origins of International Observe the Moon Night

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